Every time my daughter gets to choose the show we watch on television she picks some variation of a show where prospective buyers are searching for a tiny house.  The programming on HGTV includes shows like Tiny House Living, Tiny House Hunters, and Tiny House Builders.  This programming, which seems to run constantly, is reflective of the wave of new consumer interest in bucking the American tradition of “bigger is better.”

The tiny house phenomenon makes sense for the consumer.  The initial investment is much smaller than what is needed for a typical single-family detached home, which is particularly appealing to new college graduates with high student debt and retirees on a fixed income.  Moreover, the ongoing costs of maintaining the tiny home are comparatively lower as well.  The tiny house options also create a much smaller carbon footprint, which is appealing to environmentally-conscious consumers.  Therefore, the interest in tiny houses likely will continue to grow at a rapid pace.

But like most new housing trends, the consumer interest is ahead of the land use regulations and municipalities are playing catch up.
Continue Reading Tiny Houses – Growing Fast

When you order something online, you can immediately begin tracking the package and continue to track it until it arrives at your doorstep. Imagine if the same process was possible with all state permit applications. That is what House Bill No. 1959 (the “Bill”) intends to do. The Bill, also known as the Permit Administration Act, would implement a tracking system for state permit applications. It would create an accessible tracking system for state permit applications that would allow applicants to see the status of their applications during each step of the process. The main goal of the Bill is to make the permit application process more transparent and to provide for more timely action on state permit applications.
Continue Reading Reducing Red Tape: The Permit Administration Act

A large-scale natural gas liquids pipeline project traversing the Commonwealth has shed light on an oft misunderstood legal principle regarding the municipal regulation of utilities. Municipalities typically operate under the assumption that essentially all land uses, including public utilities, are subject to municipal regulation to at least some degree (e.g., zoning ordinances, subdivision and land development ordinance, etc.). But, most public utility facilities actually are not subject to local regulation. A pair of recent Commonwealth Court cases reinforce this legal principle that is nearly sixty-five years old but rarely reflected in municipal ordinances.
Continue Reading What do you mean that pipeline isn’t subject to zoning regulations?